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Long range handgun shootiing.


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Rebel_Rider1969

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Just when you think your a competent handgun shooter, start increasing the range. 50 yards is tough even with a 2x scope. By the end of 50 rounds I was in pizza box group territory. 100 yards seems impossible.(bullet drops +8 inches) 240grhp I was shooting the .44 Redhawk today free standing and the confidence in my shooting skills are crushed. I have a shooting stick and probably need to try it next time. I think it's gonna take 100's of rounds to get the hang of it. May switch to a red dot, seems like I shoot better using them.

Red dot that can handle the recoil? Is the TRS-25 up to this task?
 

Fear21

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I’d bump it at least to a PA / Holosun / Sig if you’re using a .44.
 

joraca

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In silhouette pistol, I at one time had NRA master and IHMSA international classifications at long range (big bore) standing pistol.

For most folks, there is a 3-7 second window of minimal gun movement that occurs somewhere between 8 and 20 seconds after you raise the gun and try to aim it at the target. At 50 yards, if your hold is pizza box sized, you may see a fairly short period of time where the "flight of the butterfly" movement of the sight is maybe basketball sized. If you are dry firing at 10 yards, it may be half-dollar sized. The trick is to make the trigger break during the period of minimal movement without jerking it.

When I set the shot shot up, I take three breaths (to run about 10 seconds off the clock without having to think about it) and then hold my breath and then I start putting pressure on the trigger to break it smoothly when (if) the gun settles into the minimal wobble. At that time, I am thinking almost exclusively about moving (steadily increasing pressure) on my trigger finger. My brain doesn't want the shot to break if it doesn't perceive that the gun is pointed at the target, and I have to overcome that and make it shoot smoothly when it is in minimal wobble and is on the target most of the time. This is very difficult to do without practice. Dry firing or shooting targets with an air gun or .22 is cheaper than with a big bore pistol.

Until you learn how to do this, I think magnification will work against you, because you will perceive more movement in the sights and more apparent time spent off-target. Once you get good, the magnification will help you determine when the minimum wobble point has been reached, but once you are good, there won't be much difference between open sight shooting and scope gun shooting in good light.

We have silhouette matches at PRPC twice a month.
 

Rebel_Rider1969

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In silhouette pistol, I at one time had NRA master and IHMSA international classifications at long range (big bore) standing pistol.

For most folks, there is a 3-7 second window of minimal gun movement that occurs somewhere between 8 and 20 seconds after you raise the gun and try to aim it at the target. At 50 yards, if your hold is pizza box sized, you may see a fairly short period of time where the "flight of the butterfly" movement of the sight is maybe basketball sized. If you are dry firing at 10 yards, it may be half-dollar sized. The trick is to make the trigger break during the period of minimal movement without jerking it.

When I set the shot shot up, I take three breaths (to run about 10 seconds off the clock without having to think about it) and then hold my breath and then I start putting pressure on the trigger to break it smoothly when (if) the gun settles into the minimal wobble. At that time, I am thinking almost exclusively about moving (steadily increasing pressure) on my trigger finger. My brain doesn't want the shot to break if it doesn't perceive that the gun is pointed at the target, and I have to overcome that and make it shoot smoothly when it is in minimal wobble and is on the target most of the time. This is very difficult to do without practice. Dry firing or shooting targets with an air gun or .22 is cheaper than with a big bore pistol.

Until you learn how to do this, I think magnification will work against you, because you will perceive more movement in the sights and more apparent time spent off-target. Once you get good, the magnification will help you determine when the minimum wobble point has been reached, but once you are good, there won't be much difference between open sight shooting and scope gun shooting in good light.

We have silhouette matches at PRPC twice a month.
Thanks. I think I'd do better with the irons, but my old eyes cant see them and the target. Trigger is very good on the redhawk. Even in DA. My father used to shoot an old blackhawk I dont think he even used the sights, point and bang, on target.
 

joraca

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Seeing the target clearly will make you feel better, but probably won't very much help you hit it. I've shot a lot of long range silhouette matches with Gordon Rysavvy in Houston Texas, who held the IHMSA record for iron sight standing. He shot wearing his computer glasses, and said he could not tell which way the turkeys (at 150 yards) were facing.

With irons, I shoot using approximately computer glasses so I can see the front sight clearly. Target definition is poor, unless I've got a diopter on. I'm 66.
 

Baddog 0302

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RR 1969,how old are your eyes ? After I turned 40 , I needed a new prescription about evey 2 years till I hit 50 or so. joraca, mentions "computer classes" that allow you to see your sights clearly and the distance 100 yd + targets not so clearly.
If you wear glasses there are a few tricks that don't cost several hundred dollars that will allow you to see your sights clearly. I'm 73,
 
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Big Shrek

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Thanks. I think I'd do better with the irons, but my old eyes cant see them and the target. Trigger is very good on the redhawk. Even in DA. My father used to shoot an old blackhawk I dont think he even used the sights, point and bang, on target.
Might be time for some Laser Eye Correction ;)

Point shooting works great, IF, and I say IF you practice regularly.
You must know that gun inside & out, backwards and forwards, add in upside down for fun.
I. E. tons of trigger time.
 

M118LR

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Even for Hunters Pistol, chickens at 25 required a toe hold, pigs at 50 held to bottom of belly, turkeys at 75 dead on, rams at 100 top of the back. Don't believe that a red-dot is finite enough, a thin horizontal line functions better if glass is required. JMHO.
 

boatbum101

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I'm an old Bullseye shooter so reddots are second nature . I also have RBH's that I hunt with . If eyes are good ( young ) open sights are OK . If you're getting up there a reddot non-magnified 30mm tube type allows you to shoot with both eyes open , is quicker to aquire target & has a wider field of view . With training one can learn to shoot precisely with even a 3 or 4 moa dot . If mounted on a magnum caliber buy the best mount / rings you can afford . Aimpoint while expensive has precise , repeatable settings , clear optics & are tougher than a hobo turd . The older Ultradot 4 moa 30mm is also good , the newer suffer from negative magnification which I don't care for . Sightron S-30's are also good & have held up so far , bought 2 a few years ago instead of Ultradots . Unless you can always shoot from a good steady position I find magnification a hinderence , with a reddot I can shoot offhand well enough to 50 - 60yds , beyond that I'll either sit & brace off my knees or use a rest on something whatever works .
 

FrommerStop

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Just when you think your a competent handgun shooter, start increasing the range. 50 yards is tough even with a 2x scope. By the end of 50 rounds I was in pizza box group territory. 100 yards seems impossible.(bullet drops +8 inches) 240grhp I was shooting the .44 Redhawk today free standing and the confidence in my shooting skills are crushed. I have a shooting stick and probably need to try it next time. I think it's gonna take 100's of rounds to get the hang of it. May switch to a red dot, seems like I shoot better using them.

Red dot that can handle the recoil? Is the TRS-25 up to this task?
I strongly suggest you start with a .22 pistol with decent trigger and if your eyes need it a red dot. Standing with just one hand on the gun is the standard for bullseye at 50 yards. Your are more than welcome to come and shoot with us on thursday mornings at 9:30 at the PRPC. No fee required for the 900 bullseye match. It is shot at 50 and 25 yards.
 

boatbum101

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Solid advice above if you wish to learn handgun fundamentals that apply regardless of application . 22 allows you to focus on the basics w/o recoil . Realitively cheap too . A good 22 with good sights , trigger , that fits your hand etc. Reddot like a scope does magnify a shooters arc of movement . Even with open sights the gun still moves around , not as apparent if you focus on front sight as supposed too . With a reddot either focus on target & superimpose dot over it ( as I do with both eyes open ) or focus on dot as you would a front sight . Take a blank piece of paper , place it @ 25yds . Shoot a 10 round group no time limit . Don't chase bullet holes , aim at the center for every shot . When you can shoot a nice round group then introduce a target . Aiming / shooting a blank page makes one focus on sights , trigger & sight alignment instead of the target . Too often even good shooters try to do it all & focus shifts between sights & target . Doesn't work pick which works for you & stay focused on that . Next learn to accept your hold . Nobody can hold absolutely still , the gun's gonna move around . In time it'll reduce & your hold will steady up . Snatching shots don't work either . Trigger control is # 1 . A smooth safe trigger helps a bunch .
 

Bthomp83

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Just when you think your a competent handgun shooter, start increasing the range. 50 yards is tough even with a 2x scope. By the end of 50 rounds I was in pizza box group territory. 100 yards seems impossible.(bullet drops +8 inches) 240grhp I was shooting the .44 Redhawk today free standing and the confidence in my shooting skills are crushed. I have a shooting stick and probably need to try it next time. I think it's gonna take 100's of rounds to get the hang of it. May switch to a red dot, seems like I shoot better using them.

Red dot that can handle the recoil? Is the TRS-25 up to this task?
I use a Sig Romeo5. Does pretty well. I have a scout scope on my other hunting revolver. Leupold VX-2 1.5-4 power. Made a 70 yard heart shot on a buck this past season.
 
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